Margaret Sanger, "Interview with London Press," 31 Oct 1935.

Source: " "Marry Young", Daily Express, Oct. 31, 1935 Cocktail-Drinking Women-Bad Mothers", Daily Mirror, Oct. 31, 1935 "Ideal Family", News Chronicle, Oct. 31, 1935."

Sanger gave press interviews in London en route to India. Text has been taken from three different articles.


MARRY YOUNG

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, United States social worker and president of the Birth Control International Information Centre, is touring the world telling the secrets of happy marriage.

One secret is "marry young."

“If young people marry early but take their time before having families,” she said, in an interview in London yesterday, “they are able to plan that adjustment which is so important in marriage.

“An only child is a tragedy--especially for the child. I consider that ‘spacing’ of three years between each child is ideal.”

COCKTAIL-DRINKING WOMEN--BAD MOTHERS

Cocktail-drinking, slimming young women inevitably make bad mothers- unless they receive frank scientific advice before marriage.

This is the view of Mrs. Margaret Sanger, president of the Birth Control International Information Centre, who would like every engaged couple to be told the “facts of life.”

“In New York,” she told me, “50,000 young people of both sexes are initiated into the mysteries of sex every year at the clinic run by my organization.

“My advice to these young couples is: ‘Want a child from the very start of marriage, so that it is ushered into the world with an invitation instead of being an unwanted guest.’

“We feel that an only child is a tragedy. ‘Spacing of three years between children is the ideal. Young people should be encouraged to marry early, but take their time before they begin to have their families.

This kindly woman’s face grew grave when she told me that time and time again she has been confronted by young women on the brink of marriage, whose nerves have been destroyed by alcohol, slimming and late nights.

“This lack of discipline,” she said, “is common to most countries. It is largely the parents’ fault. We have merely to point out the serious danger to the future race to find that these young people respond and renounce their rackety parties.

“The only consolation is that girls who deliberately blind themselves to these perils often have no children; seldom more than one.”

In a few days Mrs. Sanger is sailing to India, where she is to be a guest-speaker at the All India Women’s Conference.

“I must make it clear,” she said, “that I am not going to India to persuade everybody to have a small family. I want rather to convince them of the desirability--for themselves and posterity-- of having families of the right size and right quality.”

IDEAL FAMILY

Happier homes, fewer divorces, and more stable and permanent marriages would result if there were an interval of at least two years between marriage and the birth of the first child.

This is a conviction expressed to me by Mrs. Margaret Sanger, inventor of the phrase “birth control,” founder of the first birth control organization in America where she is one of the best-known women.

“It is all important that the newly married should get acquainted and become adjusted to each other. Children are a secondary consideration in the early years of marriage,” she said to me.

Figures in the United States show that when children are “postponed” on account of the wife continuing to work there has been a reduction of the divorce total, according to Mrs. Sanger.

The ideal marriage, she went on, would be between a man of 23 and a woman of 22. The woman would continue her job for two or three years before having a child.

The family could consist of three children, born at intervals of three years.

It is tragic to have only one child, she believes. But for the average family today a fourth child “can ruin the whole structure of the family,” and a fifth child “is enough to drive women to drink.”

“Economists have not begun to realize the possibilities in early marriages and small families,” she declared.

She pointed out the “splendid national investment” it would be to encourage early marriages with the prospect of children “postponed” until the young couple “got economically on their feet.”

Each family would need new quarters and a “complete new set of household equipment.” This would “boost things generally.”

“In the East I have found very little religious prejudice against birth control,” said Mrs. Sanger, "and no moral prejudice whatsoever.”

“If young people marry early but take their time before having families,” she said, in an interview in London yesterday, “they are able to plan that adjustment which is so important in marriage.

“An only child is a tragedy--especially for the child. I consider that ‘spacing’ of three years between each child is ideal.”


Subject Terms:

Copyright, Margaret Sanger Project


valid