Margaret Sanger, "National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control Report," 19 Jul 1937.

Source: " "More Clinics Urged for Birth Control", New York Times, Jul. 19, 1937 Auto Caravans Urged to Help Birth Control", New York Herald-Tribune Jul. 19, 1937. ."

Sanger released a press statement to coincide with an NCFLBC report. Quotes were drawn from news coverage, duplicated portions not quoting Sanger were omitted.


MORE CLINICS URGED FOR BIRTH CONTROL

A ten-fold increase in existing birth-control centers to 3,000 is recommended by Mrs. Margaret Sanger, birth-control leader, in a report on the seven years' work of the National Committee for Federal Legislation on Birth Control, which will be issued today by the organization's executive committee.

Mrs. Sanger recommends also that visiting nurses should be sent into isolated homes remote from medical service to teach birth-control measures. The committee making the report recently was dissolved after the United States Circuit Court of Appeals upheld birth control under medical direction. The executive committee comprises Mrs. Walter Timme, Mrs. Thomas N. Hepburn, Mrs. Alexander C. Barker, and Mrs. Alexander C. Dick.

“This decision,” wrote Mrs. Sanger, referring to the Circuit Court ruling, “has opened the way to a far more fundamental goal--the inclusion of birth control in public health programs and the carrying of contraceptive information to neglected mothers in isolated regions. We must help the mothers who as yet are not reached through public health channels. We urge caravans of education and help for mountain women, farm women, mothers in distant homesteads, mothers in all districts, city and country, who are neglected.

“We should send an organization of birth-control-instructing nurses to visit the homes of these underprivileged mothers. Just as members of the American Visiting Nurses Association have gone into the homes to help through bedside work, so would we like to see an army of equipped, sympathetic, understanding nurses take up this task of educating and instructing mothers in contraceptive techniques and thus free them from the constant fear which haunts their lives.”

Auto Caravans Urged to Help Birth Control

Extension of birth control clinical service by motor caravans to women of the farms and mountain regions of America was urged yesterday by Mrs. Margaret Sanger, birth control leader, in a series of recommendations advocating a ten-fold increase in birth control activities in the United States in the next year.

Mrs. Sanger estimated that 320 birth control centers were functioning at present in America, nearly all of them in large population centers. In addition, approximately 7,000 hospitals and 10,000 other agencies where medical aid is sought by mothers are now legally free to give contraceptive advice and information as a result of recent decision of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals

Caravans of Education

This decision, Mrs. Sanger said, "has opened the way to a far more fundamental goal--the inclusion of birth control in public health programs and the carrying of contraceptive information to neglected mothers in isolated regions."

"We must help the mothers who are not yet reached through public health channels. We urge caravans of education and help for mountain women, farm women, mothers on distant homesteads, mothers in all districts, city and country, who are now neglected."

Mrs. Sanger said letters received from rural communities indicated there were tens of thousands, perhaps millions of women unable to go to a clinic or obtain contraceptive information from existing organizations.

"We should send an organization of birth control instructing nurses to visit the homes of those underprivileged mothers,"Mrs. Sanger declared. "Just as members of the American Visiting Nurses Association have gone into the homes to help through bedside work, so would we like to see an army of equipped sympathetic, understanding nurses take up this task of educating and instructing mothers in contraceptive techniques and thus free them from the constant fear which haunts their lives.

Advocates 3,000 Clinics

Expressing the belief that at least 3,000 contraceptive clinics were needed in the United States, Mrs. Sanger stated:

“Only by adequate effort to save the lives of women and to promote maternal and child health can the community atone for the deaths of a million mothers during the six decades while the Comstock laws were interpreted as preventing birth control even under medical auspices. Those who won the legal fight for birth control must now move fast, and keep moving; for women and children are still needlessly dying. Their lives may be saved if contraceptive facilities become adequately available in every community.”


Subject Terms:

Copyright, Margaret Sanger Project


valid