Margaret Sanger, "National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control," 19 Jul 1937.

Source: " Unity, July 19, 1937 ."

Sanger released a press notice about the disbanding of the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control. Unity was the journal of the Unity Church, a spiritual philosophical movement.


Birth Control Committee Disbands, Victorious

The work of the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control is done and well done, the organization is therefore dissolved, Margaret Sanger, president, announced in an editorial in the current issue of her magazine, The National Birth Control News. Hailing the action of the American Medical Association as strengthening the cause of birth control, already victorious through the clarification of the Federal Comstock statute, Mrs. Sanger disclosed that her Committee has been formally dissolved by unanimous action of its Board of Directors. The Resolution embodying this action reads:

“Whereas the purposes of the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control, Inc., have been accomplished, in the light of the recent decision by the Circuit Court of Appeals,

“Be it Resolved that the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control, Inc., be dissolved...”

Her own education as a trained nurse made her see more than twenty years ago that birth control was a medical and technical problem, over and above everything else, said Mrs. Sanger.

“This has been my steadfast policy,” she continued. “We have fought for medically directed clinics, for medical support and for medical endorsement and recognition. Time and again members of the profession, even those in high standing, have told us that we could never win. But individual support grew. Organized support grew. Today we can feel that the same principles of right have won.”

The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit handed down a decision in a test case on November 30, 1936, stating that the design of the Federal Comstock statute “was not to prevent the importation, sale or carriage by mail of things which might intelligently be employed by conscientious and competent physicians for the purpose of saving life or promoting the well being of their patients.” Thus Mrs. Sanger won her fight for an amendment to the statute exempting physicians from its restrictions.

The American Medical Association at its annual Convention in Atlantic Cityunanimously adopted the report of its Committee to Study Contraceptive Practices, by action of its House of Delegates on June 8th. The Committee recommended the teaching of contraception in medical schools, the investigation of materials, devices and methods, and the clarification of physicians of their legal rights in relation to the use of contraceptives.

“Now comes the future, full of hope and challenge,” says Mrs. Sanger. “The impetus of the work is doubly renewed. We can now consolidate the gains we have made, and move steadily forward in a larger program of national and international scope.” The educational work of the birth control movement will be carried on by the Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau of New York, of which Mrs. Sanger is the director.


Subject Terms:

Copyright, Margaret Sanger Project


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