Margaret Sanger, "PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORLD POPULATION CONFERENCE Preface ," 1927.

Source: "Margaret Sanger, ed. Proceedings of the World Population Conference (London, 1927)Library of Congress Microfilm 130:725A."


PREFACE.

by MRS. MARGARET SANGER

The problems of population have been looming upon the horizon of international thought for the past ten years, and with the advance of scientific application to social problems it was only natural that some of us should turn to the scientists with the possible hope that from them might be gleaned the solution.

It was with this idea in mind that the World Population Conference was initiated and organized. It was the first time that biologists had been invited to participate with sociologists in the solution of economic problems and, as has been seen, the biological principle played a very large part in the discussions.

The result of this gathering was the recognition of the need and desire for further study, and a permanent Union for the study of Population in various countries was formed.

It has long been my desire to have the population question discussed from an international scientific standpoint, and it is with a feeling of some satisfaction that I am at last able to present to the public so complete and comprehension a volume on this great question as it was discussed at the World Population Conference.

I trust that the valuable information and data submitted herein may prove a source of help and inspiration to those who ceaselessly work towards the solution of the population problem.

My thanks are tendered to Mr. Clinton Chance, who, with Mrs. Edith How-Martyn, cooperated with me throughout and devoted over a year to the preliminary preparation for the Conference.

Thanks are due to Professor Raymond Pearl and also to Sir Bernard Mallet, who accepted the chairmanship of the Advisory Council, and also to the members of the Advisory Council for their valuable help.

I wish to make special mention of Professor Julian Huxley, whose cooperation and active participation from the outset has been one of the determining factors in the success of the Conference. He, together with Professor Carr-Saunders and Dr. Crew, has given valuable assistance and advice in the editing and completion of these Proceedings.

My warmest thanks are given also to Mrs. Cora Hodson, Miss Susan Green, Mrs. Anne Kennedy, Miss Anita Comstock, Miss W. Breed, Mrs. Marjorie Martin and many voluntary workers for their wholehearted assistance in the arrangements for the Conference.


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